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Article about death metal in Scientific American
#1
https://www.scientificamerican.com/artic...ath-metal/
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#2
(10-31-2018, 04:07 PM)metalcrypt Wrote: https://www.scientificamerican.com/artic...ath-metal/

Interesting read, thanks for posting!
We need it as a liquid in our veins instead of blood
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#3
Definitely an interesting read.

Me being a HUGE death metal fan, I have a few thoughts about this topic. And also me being someone with a doctorate in music, I kind of feel somewhat surprised that people are actually tackling this topic in such scholarly writing, because personally I don’t find it that worthy of such high scholarship. However, I may be wrong to say that. I’m just a violinist, after all.

1. Death metal was not an instant love for me. My first true beginning to it was from a Nuclear Blast Death metal DVD compilation of music videos. I got it for dirt cheap and it looked cool. More than 75% of the old school death metal videos on it (Carcass, Hate Eternal, Entombed, Dismember, and many more) were a turn off for me. I felt the performance was super sloppy, but the music videos were cool, violent, and aggressive in a way that it was still fun to watch in some way. After watching the video for Entombed’s “Left Hand Path” more than 25 times, I finally started to notice that I was beginning to understand the madness of the first 3/4 of the song, and it just started to click with me, and I noticed things I liked that I hadn’t noticed in previous listens. And this became the main takeaway for me as a budding fan of death metal: This is music that challenges me as a listener and as a musician. To find the reasoning for why this music is awesome requires careful listening sometimes, and is one reason I believe it tends to in and out of most people’s ears with no appeal. But I love the challenge of this style.

2. When I was a kid, I had a subscription to Revolver Magazine. I quickly became aware that it was a bit shitty when they were reviewing shitty music all the time and putting the Green Day and shit on the cover, but I digress. I saw a FANTASTIC interview with Corpsegrinder Fisher of Cannibal Corpse in it, and it was before I ever got into them. The interview focused heavily on the lyrics of the band, and he had such a fantastic wording of the point of the band’s lyrics in this one interview. He told it something like this: These songs are like short stories, each one perhaps a plot for a murder story like that from a horror movie or book. Their lyrics were used as a connection to other art mediums within the horror scene, and therefore they viewed these lyrics as art, rather than rubbish. I personally loved the way he described it, and I went back and listened to them with the lyrics in front of me, and I realized the genius of their lyrical approach and how well it really matched the music. I loved the brutality of the music and lyrics being matched by the intensity of the musicianship.

3. What do I feel when I listen to death metal? Not a whole lot. I’m numb to it. It’s just music to me at this point. It’s not extreme to me, nor is it underwhelming. Hardly any of it is too much/chaotic for me to appreciate or handle. But now that I’ve gone this “low” in my music tastes, I find it hard to go anywhere else at the moment. So what I look for now is bands who can combine great lyrics with intense and skillful music to match. It does give me positive emotions to listen to and think about death metal, more so than most other genres for sure. But I think that research on this as a psychological study is flawed because of many variables. You have people like me, who are not looking for any emotional gain from it. You have people who need this music to feel better. You have people who listen to it because they need a swift kick in the pants. You’ve got people who are kind of phony, and only like one death metal band. I mean, self-reporting these results really is flawed, as the article suggests at the end. So I think it’s a useless study overall. Death metal mostly doesn’t look to invite more people to fandom. I think it does fine as a sub genre that acts isolated from other metal styles.
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#4
Thanks for sharing this. A very interesting article all in all. ☺

Also, thanks to Micah as well for telling us in-depth why he finds Death Metal so appealing for himself.
"What does not kill me... Eh, makes me even more pissed off, you punk!!!"  Angry

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